Surgical Options

 

Disorders that once required open surgery such as spinal fractures, degenerative disc disease, herniated disc, and spinal deformities can now be treated with minimally disruptive procedures.

The goal of this type of surgery is to reduce trauma to the body and allow a faster return to normal activities.

These minimally disruptive spine surgeries utilize computer – assisted imaging and specialized instrumentation to perform traditional surgery, but without the trauma. Incision sites are small and the muscle – sparing techniques assist to minimize blood loss and reduce postoperative pain.

Click on the titles below to learn more about them.

ACDF

What is an ACDF Procedure?

An Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) procedure is a type of cervical spine surgery from the front (anterior) of the neck (cervical) that often successfully addresses spinal symptoms. ACDF surgery is a very common procedure relative to overall spine surgeries and has a long and studied record of positive outcomes. ACDF surgery consists of removing the damaged disc and then growing bone between the vertebrae above and below. ACDF procedures may be performed with the use of an implant, such as a plate, to provide support until fusion occurs.

Anterior approaches, such as in ACDF procedures, involve less muscle stripping from the spine and allow good access to the discs at the front of the spine compared to a back (posterior) approach. It provides the physician with a clear and uncomplicated approach to the cervical spine, and patients tend to have less incisional pain from this approach.

What are my treatment options?

Many neck and back pain symptoms can be treated without surgery with methods that involve rest, heat, medication, and physical therapy. It is important that you speak to your physician about the best options for you.

If your symptoms do not improve with other methods, your physician may suggest spinal surgery. Surgery is reserved for those who do not gain relief from non-operative forms of treatment, patients whose symptoms are increasing or worsening, and/or patients that present with a spinal condition that indicates the need for surgery.

Is ACDF right for me?

In the cervical spine, surgery is often performed via an anterior approach to address a multitude of issues, including degenerative disorders, fractures, or tumors. Your physician may determine that an ACDF procedure is a good option for you if you require an interbody fusion, are skeletally mature, and have gone through six weeks of non-surgical treatment. Conversely, your physician may determine that an ACDF procedure is not a good option for you if you are not a good candidate for fusion surgery in general due to other medical conditions. These conditions can be signs of inflammation or infection near the operative site, patient sensitivity to implant materials, patients with inadequate bone quality, and other indications.

Are there risks involved?

All surgical procedures present risks and complications that are important to discuss with your physician prior to your surgery. Listening to your physician’s guidance both before and after surgery will help to ensure the best possible outcome from your procedure.

Risks associated with anterior cervical surgery of the spine include: cervical edema (swelling); dysphagia (difficulty swallowing); dysphonia (difficulty talking); hoarseness; vocal cord paralysis; laryngeal palsy; sore throat; recurring aspirations; nerve deficits or damage; tracheal, esophageal, and pharyngeal perforation; airway obstruction; deficit or damage to the spinal cord, nerve roots, or nerves possibly resulting in paralysis; dural tears or leaking; cerebrospinal fistula; discitis, arachnoiditis, and/or other types of inflammation; loss of disc height; loss of proper curvature, correction, height, or reduction of the spine; vertebral slipping; scarring, herniation, or degeneration of adjacent discs; surrounding soft tissue damage; spinal stenosis; myelopathic, or radicular symptoms; spondylolysis; otitis media; fistula; vascular damage and/or rupture; and headache. Please contact your physician to discuss all potential risks.

What else can I do to help my decision regarding back surgery?

In addition to consulting with your physician and medical teams, it often helps to speak to someone who has been through the procedure. To connect with a Patient Ambassador who has already had this procedure, please contact us (800-745-7099).

NOTE:

While this website provides information about many different non-surgical and surgical options, it is not meant to replace any personal conversations that you should have with your physician or other member of your healthcare team.

Not all the information here will apply to your individual treatment or outcome. The information is intended to answer some of your questions and serve as a guideline for you to ask your healthcare team appropriate questions about the procedure.

ALIF

What is an ALIF procedure?

ALIF is a procedure used to treat problems such as disc degeneration, which may result in spinal instability or deformities in the curve of the spine. In this procedure, the surgeon works on the spine from the front (anterior) and removes a spinal disc in the lower (lumbar) spine. The surgeon inserts a bone graft into the space between the two vertebrae where the disc was removed (the interbody space). The goal of the procedure is to stimulate the vertebrae to grow together into one solid bone, a process known as fusion. Fusion creates a rigid and immovable column of bone in the problem section of the spine. This type of procedure attempts to reduce back pain and other symptoms.

 

What are my treatment options?

Many back and leg pain symptoms can be treated without surgery with methods that involve medicine, rest, heat, and physical therapy. It is important that you speak to your physician about the best options for you.

If your symptoms do not improve with other nonoperative methods, such as physical therapy, your physician may suggest spinal surgery. Surgery is reserved for those who do not gain relief from nonoperative forms of treatment and/or patients whose symptoms are increasing or worsening.

Is ALIF right for me?

Your physician may determine the ALIF procedure is a good option for you if you require an interbody fusion, are skeletally mature, and have received at least six weeks of nonsurgical treatment.

Conversely, your physician may determine that an ALIF procedure is not the right option for you if you are not a good candidate for fusion surgery in general due to other medical conditions. These conditions can be, but are not limited to: signs of inflammation or infection near the operative site, patient sensitivity to implant materials, patients with inadequate bone quality, previous retroperitoneal surgery, previous aortic bypass or endovascular stent graft, and other indications.

Are there risks involved?

Keep in mind that all surgical procedures present risks and complications that are important to discuss with your physician prior to your surgery. Listening to your physician’s guidance both before and after surgery will help ensure the best possible outcome from your procedure. Risks associated with the ALIF procedure include: blood vessel damage, problems with the interbody device or hardware, retrograde ejaculation (in males), deficit or damage to the spinal cord, nerve roots, or nerves, possibly resulting in paralysis or pain. Please contact your physician to discuss all potential risks.

Anterior approaches, such as in ALIF, allow access to the discs at the front of the spine and do not require muscle stripping as in posterior approaches. ALIF provides the surgeon with a clear approach to the lumbar spine with excellent access to the operative disc space. Patients tend to experience less incisional pain from this approach.

I have more questions, who can I ask?

In addition to consulting with your physician and medical teams, it often helps to speak to someone who has been through the procedure. To connect with a Patient Ambassador who has experienced this procedure, please contact us (800-745-7099).

NOTE:

While this website provides information about many different nonsurgical and surgical options, it is not meant to replace any personal conversations that you should have with your physician or other member of your healthcare team.

Not all the information here will apply to your individual treatment or outcome. The information is intended to answer some of your questions and serve as a guideline for you to ask your healthcare team appropriate questions about the procedure.

XLIF®

What is an XLIF® procedure?

The eXtreme Lumbar Interbody Fusion (XLIF) procedure is a minimally disruptive surgical procedure performed through the side of the body. It is designed to treat a range of spinal pathologies. Using patented nerve monitoring technology, the surgeon gains lateral (side) access to the spinal column, avoiding any major nerves in the area between the incision and the column. The XLIF procedure does not require an anterior (front) or posterior (back) exposure, and thereby does not present the same risks of vascular and/or neural injury as traditional approaches.

 

What are my treatment options?

Many spine symptoms may be treated without surgery via methods that involve medication, rest, heat, and physical therapy. It is important that you speak to your physician about the best options for you. If your symptoms do not improve with other methods, your physician may suggest spinal surgery. Surgery is reserved for those who do not gain relief from nonoperative forms of treatment, patients whose symptoms are increasing or worsening, and/or patients that present with a spinal condition that indicates the need for surgery.

Is XLIF right for me?

If you require spinal surgery, your physician may determine that the XLIF procedure is the right option for you. Some examples of pathologies (conditions) that may be ideal for the XLIF procedure include:

  • Degenerated discs and/or facet joints that cause unnatural motion and pain
  • Slippage of one vertebra over another
    (Degenerative spondylolisthesis secondary to advanced degenerative disc disease)
  • Change in the normal curvature of the spine
    (Degenerative scoliosis secondary to advanced degenerative disc disease)

Conversely, your physician may determine that an XLIF procedure is not a good option for you. It is important to discuss this with your physician in order to determine the best course of treatment for you.

Are there risks involved?

Keep in mind that all surgical procedures present risks and complications that are important to discuss with your surgeon prior to your surgery. Listening to your physician’s guidance, both before and after surgery, will help to ensure the best possible outcome from your procedure.

Potential risks following XLIF surgery include: problems with anesthesia, infection, nerve damage, problems with the graft or hardware, and ongoing pain. This is not intended to be a complete list of the possible complications. Please contact your physician to discuss all potential risks.

What else can I do to help my decision regarding back surgery?

In addition to consulting with your physician and medical teams, it often helps to speak to someone who has undergone the procedure. To connect with a Patient Ambassador who has experienced the XLIF procedure, please contact us (800-745-7099).

NOTE:

While this website provides information about many different non-surgical and surgical options, it is not meant to replace any personal conversations that you should have with your physician or other member of your healthcare team.

Not all the information here will apply to your individual treatment or outcome. The information is intended to answer some of your questions and serve as a guideline for you to ask your healthcare team appropriate questions about the procedure.

XLIF Corpectomy

What is an XLIF® Corpectomy procedure?

The eXtreme Lateral Interbody Fusion (XLIF) Corpectomy procedure is a minimally disruptive surgical procedure performed through the side of the body. A corpectomy (with corpus meaning “body”, and ectomy meaning “remove”) is an effective procedure where the vertebral body and the adjoining discs are removed. An XLIF Corpectomy is used to treat patients suffering from severe spinal cord injuries resulting from trauma or tumors where a large part of the vertebrae must be removed.

Depending on your surgeon’s preference, patented nerve monitoring technology may be used to gain lateral (side) access to the spinal column, avoiding any major nerves in the area between the incision and the column. Traditional surgical options for addressing a corpectomy typically involve large exposures. The XLIF Corpectomy procedure allows surgeons to treat corpectomy patients through a reproducible, minimally disruptive exposure that provides direct visualization to the affected area.

What are my treatment options?

Many of the symptoms may be treated without surgery with methods that involve medication, rest, heat, and physical therapy. It is important that you speak to your physician about the best options for you.

If your symptoms do not improve with other methods, your physician may suggest spinal surgery. Surgery is reserved for those who do not gain relief from non-operative forms of treatment, patients whose symptoms are increasing or worsening, and/or patients that present with a spinal condition which indicates the need for surgery.

Is XLIF Corpectomy right for me?

If you require spinal surgery, your physician may determine that the XLIF Corpectomy procedure is a good option for you.

Some examples of pathologies that may be ideal for the XLIF Corpectomy procedure include:

  • Vertebral body fracture(s)
  • Vertebral body tumor

Conversely, your physician may determine that an XLIF Corpectomy procedure is not a good option for you. It is important to discuss this with your physician.

Are there risks involved?

Keep in mind that all surgical procedures present risks and complications that are important to discuss with your physician prior to your surgery. Listening to your physician’s guidance, both before and after surgery, will help to ensure the best possible outcome from your procedure.

Some of the most common complications following XLIF Corpectomy surgery include: problems with anesthesia, infection, nerve damage, problems with the graft or hardware, and ongoing pain. This is not intended to be a complete list of the possible complications.

What else can I do to help my decision regarding back surgery?

In addition to consulting with your physician and medical teams, it often helps to speak to someone who has been through the procedure. To connect with a Patient Ambassador who has already had an XLIF corpectomy, please contact us (800-745-7099).

NOTE:

While this website provides information about many different nonsurgical and surgical options, it is not meant to replace any personal conversations that you should have with your physician or other member of your healthcare team.

Not all the information here will apply to your individual treatment or its outcome. The information is intended to answer some of your questions and serve as a guideline for you to ask your healthcare team appropriate questions about the procedure.

MAS® PLIF

What is a MAS® PLIF procedure?

Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF) is a surgical procedure that attempts to eliminate instability in the back and pain in the lower back and lower extremities. A Maximum Access Surgery Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (MAS PLIF) achieves this by using a less disruptive approach to decompress nerve roots and fuse one or more vertebrae together to reduce their motion.

The distinct difference between a traditional “open” PLIF and a MAS PLIF is the medialized surgical approach. The MAS PLIF procedure is designed to eliminate the need to retract muscle laterally, therefore requiring a smaller incision than an “open” PLIF. By minimizing the amount of muscle disruption, this procedure is intended to reduce postoperative approach – related muscle pain and enable a faster recovery for the patient.

What are my treatment options?

Many symptoms can be treated without surgery with methods that involve medication, rest, heat, and physical therapy. It is important that you speak to your physician about the best options for you.

If your symptoms do not improve with other methods, your physician may suggest spinal surgery. Surgery is reserved for those who do not gain relief from nonoperative forms of treatment, patients whose symptoms are increasing or worsening, and/or patients that present with a spinal condition which indicates the need for surgery.

Is MAS PLIF right for me?

Your physician might determine a MAS PLIF procedure as the right option for you if you require an intervertebral fusion at any lumbar level between L1 and S1 and if you would benefit from a less disruptive approach.

Conversely, your physician may determine that a MAS PLIF procedure is not a good option for you. It is important to discuss all treatment options with your physician.

Are there risks involved?

Keep in mind that all surgical procedures present risks and complications that are important to discuss with your physician prior to your surgery. Listening to your physician’s guidance both before and after surgery will help to ensure the best possible outcomes from your procedure.

Some of the most common complications following MAS PLIF surgery include: problems with anesthesia, infection, nerve damage, problems with the graft or hardware, and ongoing pain. This is not intended to be a complete list of the possible complications.

I have more questions, who can I ask?

In addition to consulting with your physician and medical teams, it often helps to speak to someone who has been through the procedure. To connect with a Patient Ambassador who has already had this procedure, please contact us (800-745-7099).

NOTE:

While this website provides information about many different nonsurgical and surgical options, it is not meant to replace any personal conversations that you should have with your physician or other member of your healthcare team.

Not all the information here will apply to your individual treatment or outcome. The information is intended to answer some of your questions and serve as a guideline for you to ask your healthcare team appropriate questions about the procedure.

MAS TLIF

What is a MAS® TLIF procedure?

Lumbar interbody fusion is a surgical procedure that attempts to eliminate instability in the back. A Maximum Access Surgery Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (MAS TLIF) achieves this by using a less invasive approach to fuse one or more vertebrae together to reduce their motion.

In a MAS TLIF procedure, rather than starting from the middle of the back and spreading the muscles to the sides like in a traditional back surgery, the MAS TLIF approach starts off to one side of the back and splits (rather than cuts) the back muscles in one direction. This allows the surgeon to make a smaller incision with less muscle injury, which may result in less postoperative pain and a quicker recovery.

What are the potential advantages of MAS TLIF*?

  • Reduced blood loss and minimal scarring
  • Reduced hospital stay
  • Faster postoperative recovery time
  • Smaller incision

*Data on file

What are my treatment options?

Many spine symptoms can be treated without surgery with methods that involve medicine, rest, heat, and physical therapy. It is important that you speak to your physician about the best options for you.

If your symptoms do not improve with other methods, your physician may suggest spinal surgery. Surgery is reserved for those who do not gain relief from nonoperative forms of treatment and/or patients whose symptoms are increasing or worsening.

Is MAS TLIF right for me?

Your physician might determine a MAS TLIF procedure the right option for you if you require a spinal fusion at any lumbar level between L1 and S1, and you would benefit from a less disruptive approach.

Conversely, your physician may determine that a MAS TLIF procedure is not a good option for you.  It is important to discuss this with your physician.

Are there risks involved?

All surgical procedures present risks and complications that are important to discuss with your physician prior to your surgery. Listening to your physician’s guidance, both before and after surgery, will help to ensure the best possible outcomes from your procedure.

Some of the most common complications following MAS TLIF surgery include: problems with anesthesia, infection, nerve damage, problems with the graft or hardware, and ongoing pain. This is not intended to be a complete list of the possible complications.

I have more questions, who can I ask?

In addition to consulting with your physician and medical teams, it often helps to speak to someone who has been through the procedure. To connect with a Patient Ambassador who has already had this procedure, please contact us (800-745-7099).

NOTE:

While this website provides information about many different nonsurgical and surgical options, it is not meant to replace any personal conversations that you should have with your physician or other member of your healthcare team.

Not all the information here will apply to your individual treatment or outcome. The information is intended to answer some of your questions and serve as a guideline for you to ask your healthcare team appropriate questions about the procedure.

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